You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

emotions

The strength of a person’s emotional bond to a physical place is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.  To be clear, the scale is intended to measure attachment to the physical aspect of the place rather than attachment to the people who come there.

Using four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the strength of a person’s emotional bond to the people associated with a specific place.  To be clear, the scale is intended to measure attachment to the people who come to a place or, possibly, work there rather than attachment to the physical dimension of the place.

The degree to which a person believes a particular experience was peaceful and relaxing is measured with four, five-point items.

Three, nine-point items measure a person’s positive affective state at a particular point in time that is characterized by feelings of joy and elation.

The scale measures a person’s positive affective state at a particular point in time characterized by feelings of affection and closeness.  A two-item version as well as a version with three-items were used by Cavanaugh, Bettman, and Luce (2015).

The three item, seven-point scale measures the extent to which a person is in a state of indifference and lacks any particular emotion at that point in time.

Seven, seven-point Likert-type items measure a person’s general and enduring tendency to experience feelings that are expressed in terms of optimism about the future.

With six, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s general and enduring tendency to experience feelings of closeness and trust with other people.

The scale measures the degree to which a consumer anticipates feeling wrong if he/she does not purchase a product that is linked in some way to helping a particular charity.  Three, eleven-point Likert-type items compose the scale.

The degree to which a person reports feeling mellow or, at the other extreme, very energetic is measured with three, seven-point semantic differentials.