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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensable in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

emotions

The tendency for a person to notice and attend to thoughts and feelings having to do with physical aspects of his/her body is measured with six, seven-point items.

The scale has three, seven-point items that measure a person’s tendency to notice and attend to his/her emotions and changing moods.

A person’s tendency to express and verbalize his/her thoughts and feelings is measured with eight items.

The tendency for a person to notice or attend to a variety of stimuli, both internal (such as thoughts and feelings) as well as external (such as sights, sounds, and smells) is measured with 12 items.

The scale is composed of six, nine-point uni-polar items that measure one’s expressed level of unfavorable feelings.  While the scale appears to be amenable for use in a wide variety of situations, it seems to be best suited for occasions in which respondents have experienced something that did not go as well as expected.

The six item, seven-point scale measures the degree to which a person experiences feelings of anticipation such as excitement (at one extreme) or apprehension (at the other extreme) with regard to an upcoming event or activity.

Using three, seven-point items, the scale measures how lonely a person reports feeling at a point in time, especially as compared to “other people.”

The degree to which a person experiences negative emotions and thoughts for throwing away something in particular is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  The scale may make most sense to use in contexts where the person is aware of alternatives for disposing of the item, particularly recycling. 

The scale employs eight, ten-point items to measure how stress-free and comfortable a person feels with respect to his/her financial condition.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person has an affective connection with a particular organization that is reflected in expressions of positive emotions.