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emotions

The scale employs eight, ten-point items to measure how stress-free and comfortable a person feels with respect to his/her financial condition.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person has an affective connection with a particular organization that is reflected in expressions of positive emotions.

A consumer’s belief that a product or set of products connote warmth and passion in some way is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  The product, the producer, and the manner in which “love” is conveyed are not specified in the items themselves.

How much a person relies on his/her feelings in making decisions across situations is measured with seven, seven-point items.

Using three, seven-point items, the scale measures how much a person feels undecided and doubtful about something he/she has done such as choice that was made.

The tendency to worry about what other people think of oneself is measured with 12, seven-point items.

The extent to which a person relied on his/her emotions and intuition when evaluating an advertisement is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a person feels responsible and sorry for a particular incident is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

How a person reports feeling (affectively) is measured with six, nine-point semantic differentials.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure how much a person is motivated and feels “right” about his/her reactions to some stimulus.