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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

employees

The scale uses four, seven-point Likert-type items to measure how much a person believes that employees at lower levels of an organization should not have much power and should follow those at higher levels in order for the organization to be successful.

The extent to which an entity (company, organization, person, etc.) is viewed as compassionate and moral or, at the other extreme, cruel and harmful is measured with three, seven-point semantic differentials.

The belief that an employee can reward and punish other employees is measured with three, seven-point items.

With three, seven-point items, the scale measures how much a person believes that a particular employee has a prestigious position in a company and is admired by other employees.

Three semantic differentials are used to measure whether a customer has more of a communal relationship or an exchange relationship with a business or employee.  In the scale, a communal relationship is informal and like a family whereas an exchange relationship is formal and purely transactional.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure how much a person believes a particular party is at fault for an offense that occurred.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure how strongly a person believes that an employee has engaged in behaviors to politely and attentively address a customer’s concerns (unspecified).

Using three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a person believes that an employee has engaged in behaviors to actively and competently solve a customer’s problem.

Eight, seven-point Likert-type items measure a consumer’s belief that a particular company engages in behaviors that are thought to advance social good such as caring for people and the environment.

With four, nine-point items, the scale measures the extent to which a person believes that one or more employees of a company engaged in improper activity that deceived and harmed clients.  WARNING: The article in which this scale was reported has been retracted by the second author due to anomilies in the data and analyses [Journal of Consumer Research (2020), 47 (4), 632]. The extent to which the anomilies affected this scale is unknown.