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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

esteem

Three seven-point, Likert-type items are used to measure a person’s belief that being in a particular restaurant gives him/her the feeling of being special and having more social status than in other restaurants. 

The extent to which a person believes that a restaurant is very special and has more social status than other restaurants is measured using seven-point, Likert-type items.  A two- and a four-item version are provided. 

One’s belief that he/she has value because of the love that comes from GOD is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.

With three, seven-point items, the scale measures how much a person looks up to and respects another person. 

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person has an overall respect of self and feeling of inherent value.

This five-item, seven-point Likert scale measures a person’s belief that his/her self-worth is based on performing better than others on a task or skill.

How much a person believes that a certain event would negatively affect his/her morale and pride is measured with five, seven-point items.

The extent to which a person believes that others view him/her as socially inferior is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The level of self-satisfaction and sense of accomplishment one feels as a result of something in particular is measured with five, nine-point unipolar items.

Four, ten point, semantic differentials are used to measure how positively or negatively a person feels about him- or her-self.