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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales website is a gold mine of information.  It is the only source that helps me understand the psychometric quality of the instruments used in past research.  I recommend that researchers bookmark this site . . . they will be back!
Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

familiarity

With eight, six-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much at a particular moment in time one’s motivation is to be around people and situations in which he/she has high certainty of what to expect.

This three-item, seven-point Likert-type scale measures the degree to which a customer gets bored always buying the same brands and, because of that, is motivated to shop for different brands.

The scale uses seven items to measure how much a person believes that a particular typeface is uncommon and difficult to read.  Responses to the items are made with a seven-point Likert-type scale.

The scale has four, seven-point items that measure a consumer’s relative level of familiarity with a product category as well as a good understanding of the attributes that will provide satisfaction.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items measure a person’s enjoyment of trying unfamiliar experiences. Although three of the statements are general and do not indicate what is being experienced, two items mention products.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree of knowledge a person has about the normal price level of a particular product category.

Using three, six-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s familiarity and proficiency with the language used in a particular advertisement.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure whether the product featured in an ad is considered fresh and new or old and routine.

Four, seven-point items measure a person’s knowledge of and experience with a particular physical exercise.

Using seven statements, this scale measures the degree to which a person believes that he/she is familiar with and has experience using goods and/or services in a particular domain.  Versions of the scale are described for tech products, fast-food restaurants, personal banking, movie theaters, and social media websites.