You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

The Marketing Scales website is a gold mine of information.  It is the only source that helps me understand the psychometric quality of the instruments used in past research.  I recommend that researchers bookmark this site . . . they will be back!
Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

feedback

How much a person was able to see the visual aspects of a hologram is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Using three, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a customer of a company believes that a particular employee of a company provides timely and regular information about how the customer’s suggestions and other involvement help to improve customer service.

With four, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a customer provides feedback to a company about his/her experiences brand’s products in order to help improve them or have new ones created.  The implication in the sentences is that this behavior is ongoing rather than a one-time event.

Four, seven-point items are used to measure a person’s belief that an entity (such as a company or person) has responded to his/her idea sharing in such a way that it enriched one’s social value.

The scale uses three, seven-point items to measure a person’s belief that an entity (such as a company or person) has responded to his/her idea sharing such that it negatively affected one’s social value.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert items to measure the degree to which the feedback provided by a customer to a service provider is meant to show concern for the future of their relationship.

With three, seven-point items, this scale measures a consumer’s expressed probability of providing ideas and feedback to a particular business entity in the future.

A person's belief that expressing his/her opinion about a certain brand to others will enable comparisons with their experiences and feelings is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Four statements are used in this scale to measure how a person feels about money he/she has received.  In the study by Raghubir and Srivastava (2009), the scale was used to measure how people felt about the compensation they received from a market research firm for participating in a study.  The scale seems to be amenable for use in a wider variety of contexts such as how consumers feel about product rebates, tax refunds, and legal settlements.

Six, seven-point items are used in the scale to measure the degree to which a person believes a website allows a free flow of information from the user as well as to the user (two-way).