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friendly

The scale measures how much the service employees of a company are believed to be competent, polite, and helpful among other characteristics.  Two versions of the scale are described, one that has eight, eleven-point items and another with six, seven-point items.

How much a person describes another person as a friend who is likable and fun to be around is measured with four, five-point Likert-type items.

Using nine-point unipolar items, the scale measures the degree to which a company is considered to be moral, kind, and helpful in its interactions with customers.  Two versions of the scale are described: one with three items and another with ten.

Three, nine-point unipolar items measure the extent to which a company or set of companies is viewed as lacking friendliness and warmth in its interactions with customers.

The scale has six items that measure the degree to which a consumer believes a particular salesperson with whom he/she has interacted tried to build a rapport and an emotional connection between them prior to or along with discussion of sales issues.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure how much a person describes him/herself as talkative and gregarious.

How much a person is sociable and talkative is measured with six, seven-point Likert-type items.

Three semantic differentials are used to measure whether a customer has more of a communal relationship or an exchange relationship with a business or employee.  In the scale, a communal relationship is informal and like a family whereas an exchange relationship is formal and purely transactional.

How kind and friendly something appears to be is measured with seven-point items.  Three similar versions are described and, depending upon the version, the scales seem to be flexible for use with a variety of objects such as people, animals, and brands.

The degree to which something is viewed as sincere, friendly, and good-natured is measured with six, seven-point uni-polar items.  The scale is general in the sense that it has been used with respect to both individuals and organizations.