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This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

gamble

The degree to which a person believes that online gambling is socially acceptable according to dominant norms and values is measured with twelve, seven-point Likert-type items.

A person's reported difficulty in making a decision regarding a gambling-related risk is measured in this scale with three, seven-point questions.

A five-item, four-point Likert-like scale is used to measure a person's agreement about the negative effects of legalized casino-gambling in his/her city.

A nine-item, four-point Likert-like scale is used to measure a person's agreement about the positive benefits of legalized casino-gambling in his/her city.

This scale is intended to measure the extent to which a person engages in a detrimental amount and form of gambling. There were two versions of the scale as explained below. Cowley (2008) referred to both versions of the scale as PIP (potentially irresponsible playing).

This three item, seven-point scale is intended to measure the degree to which a person who is participating in some sort of a gamble is experiencing stress about not winning.

The scale is composed of four, seven-point Likert-type statements that measure a consumer's thoughts about the degree to which he/she avoids taking risks in life.