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Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

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Six, nine-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person is easily able to imagine how furniture would look in a dwelling (house or apartment).

The scale uses four, seven-point items to measure how much a person has the desire to be around and in touch with things from “home,” however he/she defines it.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure a person’s belief that everyone could experience a house fire and, if it occurs, smoke detectors can reduce the damage.

The scale has three, five-point Likert-type items which measure a consumer’s objections to having a product installed on his/her house.  The objections have to do with the effort involved with the installation process and making the product fit the house’s existing structure.  

Five, five-point Likert-type statements are used to assess the degree to which a consumer believes that a computer has changed key aspects of his/her life, particularly in the home.

It is a three-item, five-point Likert-type summated ratings scale measuring the one's attitude about direct marketing activities being aimed at him/her.

Six, seven-point items are used to measure the degree to which an apartment featured in an ad is viewed as being of high quality.

Three, five-point Likert-type items that appear to measure the value a person places on being a homemaker. The scale measures not only whether the respondent views herself/himself as a homemaker but also the importance of that role in general.

Five, seven-point items measure the degree to which a consumer believes that having home-cooked meals and eating together as a family is important.

A four-item, six-point, Likert-type scale is used to measure a person's dislike of housekeeping. A two-item version of the scale was used by Lumpkin and Darden (1982) as well as Hawes and Lumpkin (1984).