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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

honesty

How much a person feels like an impostor or a fake when engaging in an activity with a particular product is measured with five, seven-point uni-polar items.  The scale may make the most sense in contexts which involve the use of luxury goods or services. 

The extent to which a person considers another person to be honest and true to him/herself is measured with four, seven-point Likert items.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure how much a person believes that some customers have endorsed an agent because they sincerely think he/she is worth it.

Four statements measure a person’s belief that when posting information on social media, he/she is more revealing and less restrained about expressing thoughts and feelings. 

Using nine-point unipolar items, the scale measures the degree to which a company is considered to be moral, kind, and helpful in its interactions with customers.  Two versions of the scale are described: one with three items and another with ten.

Three, nine-point unipolar items measure the extent to which a company or set of companies is viewed as lacking friendliness and warmth in its interactions with customers.

This six-item scale measures how much a person believes that the writer of a review was honest and accurately described his/her experience with the “product” (broadly defined).

With five, seven-point semantic differentials, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes a particular candidate has positive attributes such as sincerity and knowledgeability that make him/her qualified for the political office.

Four, nine-point items compose the scale which measures the extent to which a person believes an employee of a company has done something that is either immoral and damaging to his/her company or, at the other extreme, was honest and helpful.  WARNING: The article in which this scale was reported has been retracted by the second author due to anomilies in the data and analyses [Journal of Consumer Research (2020), 47 (4), 632]. The extent to which the anomilies affected this scale is unknown.

Four, seven-point, semantic differentials measure how honest and legitimate something is believed to be.