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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensable in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

influence

Composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items, this scale measures how much a person believes that, in a particular past situation, other people had a lot of power over him/her.

How much a person believes his/her personal actions can help end a behavior that is viewed negatively is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.  The items are amenable for use in a variety of situations where a particular behavior is viewed as inappropriate and the person is not alone in believing it.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a particular company makes a customer feel like he/she has some influence on it.

This measure uses six, nine-point items to assess the extent to which a person believes that a company or set of companies have leadership in the marketplace and can influence suppliers, competitors, and consumers.

The belief that an employee can reward and punish other employees is measured with three, seven-point items.

The scale uses three, seven-point items to measure the degree to which a person believes that an unspecified “external force” is pushing him/her forward.

Six, seven-point Likert-type items measure a person’s resistance to norms and influence from others.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s belief that the way something was sponsored made him/her feel more positively towards sponsorship in general.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items measure a person’s stated likelihood of buying a brand due to its sponsorship of something such as event or cause.

The scale uses four, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a person believes the way an event is sponsored will increase his/her interest in the event and the likelihood of attending it.