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As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

Internet

Eight, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure how much a person has a one-sided “relationship” with a vlogger (video blogger) and thinks of that media personality as a friend.

Composed of three, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a consumer believes that a particular website, most likely an online retailer, provides ways for customers to reach them and even speak with a live representative if desired.

The belief that a certain website is of high quality, particularly with respect to its design and content, is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a customer enjoyed the experience of shopping at a particular store, website, mall, etc. is measured in this scale with three, five-point Likert-type items. 

The scale uses three statements to measure the degree to which a consumer likes Internet shopping sites to facilitate the connection of shoppers so they can share ideas and help each other.  As currently phrased, the items are not specific to a particular website but rather to shopping sites in general.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items intended to measure the ease with which a person reports being able to order and pay for products at a particular website.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items that are used to measure a person's belief that a company (or companies) should inform consumers if personal information is gathered from them and how it is used.

This seven item, seven-point Likert-type scale measures the degree to which a person views various online activities as potential threats to one's security and/or privacy, particularly when buying products.

This three-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is intended to measure the extent to which a consumer believes that shopping at a particular website is an efficient use of his/her time. Mathwick, Malhotra, and Rigdon (2002) also used the scale with reference to a catalog.

The three, seven-point Likert-type items in this scale measure the degree to which a person believes that the ability to access the Internet with a mobile device gives him/her spatial flexibility. As currently phrased, the implication in the items is that the person is experienced using an Internet-enabled mobile phone.