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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensable in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

Internet

Eight, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure how much a person has a one-sided “relationship” with a vlogger (video blogger) and thinks of that media personality as a friend.

The degree to which a customer enjoyed the experience of shopping at a particular store, website, mall, etc. is measured in this scale with three, five-point Likert-type items. 

The scale uses three statements to measure the degree to which a consumer likes Internet shopping sites to facilitate the connection of shoppers so they can share ideas and help each other.  As currently phrased, the items are not specific to a particular website but rather to shopping sites in general.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items intended to measure the ease with which a person reports being able to order and pay for products at a particular website.

This seven item, seven-point Likert-type scale measures the degree to which a person views various online activities as potential threats to one's security and/or privacy, particularly when buying products.

The scale measures the the extent to which a person perceives that an advertisement has interfered with his/her processing of the non-advertising content of a medium, e.g., watching a TV program, surfing the web, reading articles in a magazine. Although the construct is theorized to lead to negative affective reactions (irritation) and behavioral responses (avoidance), it is viewed as distinct from them.

The scale is composed of five, seven-point Likert type statements intended to measure a person's attitude about the extent to which a website tailors its products, promotion, and transactional environment to individual customers.

The scale has three items and is intended to measure a person's attitude about the way a particular website manages orders with the emphasis on issues relevant to customers, e.g., providing confirmation of orders, delivery options, and clear return policies.

Five, seven-point Likert type items are used to measure a customer's attitude regarding the extent to which a website has been responsive to problems and shown that it cares, particularly in the post-sales phase of the purchase process (billing, delivery, returns).

The scale is composed of seven-point Likert-type items used to measure the degree to which shopping that utilizes a technological device or system is viewed by a person as a pleasant, and possibly exciting, activity.