You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensable in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

investments

The scale uses three, seven-point items to measure the level of understanding a person believes he/she has of annuities.

Six, yes/no items are used to measure how much a person indicates that he/she has engaged in financially related activities that are generally considered positive, e.g., put aside some money for financial emergencies.

With three questions and a seven-point response format, the scale measures how important it was to increase gains when making a particular financial decision.

How important it was to a person to avoid potential losses when making a particular financial decision is measured with three questions and a seven-point response format.

Thirteen items are used to measure the level of objective knowledge a person has of basic financial concepts.  An eight-item version is also discussed.

A person’s confidence in his/her ability to make good decisions is measured with six, five-point items.

How a person believes his/her capability and confidence compare to other people investing in the stock market is measured with three, seven-point items.

Using three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s inclination to refrain from investing in the stock market because of the risks involved.

A person’s belief that a company’s stock will increase in value is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale uses four, seven-point Likert-type items to measure a person's general attitude about how "good" an investment is considered to be.