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Three, seven-point items are used to measure how much a person believes that rent-to-own businesses improve lives and provide important services to society.

How much one wants to be in control of his/her life, most particularly his/her job, is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

This scale is composed of three, seven-point items that measure how much a person believes another person is busy at work rather than spending time in leisure activities.

Three questions with seven-point response alternatives measure the extent to which a person believes a particular person is sought after in the job market.

Three items are used to measure a person's belief that countries which are the recipients of jobs or other functions that have been moved from their original country (outsourced) are unfairly taking advantage of lower labor costs.

Six statements are used in this scale to measure a person's belief that companies should not send jobs to other countries and it is the government's responsibility to make sure it does not happen.

The scale uses five, five-point statements to measure the perceived probability that a person will advance through the stages of a job application process from contacting the company to accepting the position if it is offered.

Four, five-point Likert-type statements are used to measure the degree to which a person believes that an advertisement about a job opening at a company provides useful details.

Three, five-point Likert-type statements are used to measure the degree to which a person believes that a job described in an advertisement is suitable and relevant given his/her education, experience, and interests.

The scale is composed of five questions that are purported to measure a person's sense of the extent to which certain professions are part of the workforce. These particular occupations are specified due to being highlighted in prime-time TV shows and could be perceived as a larger proportion of the population than they really are.