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Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

knowledge

Three items are used to measure the degree to which a person receives information from someone else that is beyond what the person was already aware of.  The items in the scale are rather general but may make the most sense when an important decision is about to be made by a person (the participant) and a conversation with someone with greater knowledge or expertise on the topic provides information that changes the participant's attitude.

With three items, the scale measures how much a customer in a store learned information, primarily from an employee, that was relevant.

A consumer’s level of knowledge about a brand and recognition of it among other brands is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

How familiar a consumer is with a brand based on hearing about it, buying it, and/or using it is measured with four, seven-point semantic-differentials.

How difficult a person thinks it would be to make a particular choice is measured in this scale with three, seven-point Likert items.

With four, seven-point items, the scale measures how much a person thinks that a particular other person knows a brand better than other consumers and could be considered an expert. 

Containing eight, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures very basic beliefs and comprehension of what buyers and sellers do.  The scale seems most relevant to use for those living in subsistence marketplaces.  It may also be useful when studying what children understand about the market.

The scale is composed of five Likert-type statements that are used to measure one’s confidence in his/her ability to buy the “right” brand that will lead to a satisfying outcome.

One's attitude regarding his/her ability to accurately remember things he/she has experienced or known in the past is measured with four, seven-point items.

The scale uses three, seven-point items to measure the level of understanding a person believes he/she has of annuities.