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Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

knowledge

A person's belief that he/she has the ability to adhere to specific dietary guidelines is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a consumer reports having a lot of knowledge and experience with so-called "green products" is measured using four, seven-point Likert-type items.

A person's knowledge of various typical consumer financial products is measured by asking ten questions.  It is considered an objective measure rather than a subjective one because each question has a correct answer rather than being a person's opinion of his/her knowledge level.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure one's self-expressed level of understanding of a particular investment, especially how it functions in saving money, and one's comfort in choosing to invest in it.

A person's self-confidence in his/her ability to open e-mail messages if so desired is measured using five items. 

How easily a person is able to convert an amount of money in an unfamiliar currency to an equivalent amount in a familiar currency is measured in this scale using four, seven-point semantic differentials.

Three semantic differentials are used in this scale to measure ones self-expressed level of skill and competence with respect to playing video games.

Three, nine-point items are used to measure the degree to which a person believes that a sensory experience with a product from a category would provide him/her with a better understanding of the different types within the category.  To be clear, this scale focuses on the differences between product types across a category (breadth) rather than the similarity within one type of product (depth).

How much a person anticipates that his/her sensory experience with a product would familiarize him/her with the common aspects of products of that type is measured with three, nine-point items.  To be clear, this scale is intended to measure the similarity within one type of a product (the person's preferred type) rather than measuring the differences between types across a category.

The scale uses seven-point semantic-differentials to measure a consumer's opinion of his/her familiarity with and expertise in buying products within a certain category.