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The scale uses five items to measure a person's level of confidence in regulating his/her food consumption.

The scale uses five items to measure a person's self-confidence in his/her ability to forward e-mail messages to others if the content is considered to have value for them. 

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure a consumer's subjective knowledge of the prices charged by stores for similar products and an understanding of their various price-related specials. 

The level of confidence a person has in his/her knowledge of prices for various brands in a particular product category is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The confidence a consumer expresses in his/her ability to interact with salespeople and make good shopping decisions is measured in this scale with three items.

The scale has four, seven-point Likert-type items that are intended to measure how well a person believes that he/she is able to use the services of a business.

The extent to which a person knows what is expected in his/her role as a customer of a business is measured in this scale with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

One's belief that he/she understands recycling and is capable of doing it is measured in this scale with three statements.  Although not explicit in the statements themselves, the context they refer to is the type of recycling in which the individual must play an active role such as in the home.

A person's self-expressed level of skill and creativity in designing some specified object is measured in this scale using four, nine-point Likert-type items.

The clarity of the memory a person has of some particular object or event is measured with three, seven-point semantic differentials.