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Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

knowledge

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used in the scale to measure the degree to which a person tends to be aware of and to understand his/her emotions.

This scale uses three, seven-point items to measure how a consumer feels about the brands as a group in a particular product category.  In other words, to what extent does a person have a good or bad attitude towards most of the brands in a product class.  Fischer, Völckner, and Sattler (2010) referred to the scale as brand likability

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the certainty a consumer expresses about knowing most if not all of the brands in a particular product category.  There are many scales in the database regarding knowledge of the product class but this one is somewhat distinct in its focus on one's familiarity with the brands themselves.  Fischer, Völckner, and Sattler (2010) referred to the scale as brand clarity.

A consumer's belief in his/her ability to evaluate a set of products and choose the best one is measured in this three item, five-point Likert-type scale.  The scale was called competence by Fuchs, Prandelli, and Schreier (2010).

The degree to which a person is aware and knowledgeable of a brand is measured in this scale with three, semantic differentials.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure the degree to which the person is confident about his/her ability to make predictions about a firm and its products.   The scale was referred to as uncertainty reduction by Adjei, Noble, and Noble (2010).

A person's ability to identify and categorize his/her specific moods is measured in this scale with four, five-point Likert-type items.

Using four, seven-point items, this scale measures a consumer's ability to explain the reasons why a particular brand or type of product is preferred.

This three item, seven-point scale measures a consumer's ease of making purchases within a product category because of his/her established, prepurchase preference.

This is a four-item, five-point Likert-type scale that measures the degree to which a person believes TV commercials are a good way to learn about a product's social aspects, with an emphasis on who appears to use it.