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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensable in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

knowledge

Four, seven-point Likert-type items measure a consumer's reported knowledge of brands in a specified product category as well as the important criteria to use in making a selection.

This five-item, seven-point scale is used to measure various aspects (knowledge, use, importance) of a consumer's involvement with several product categories.

A three-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person would feel in control in a particular setting and be able to influence outcomes.

A three-item, seven-point scale is used to assess the ease of using a computer to perform some task that a person reports experiencing.

A three-item, eleven-point scale is used to provide an idea about the certainty with which a consumer perceives he/she has been able to accurately reflect his/her evaluation of a brand.

This three-item, seven-point scale is intended to measure the certainty with which a consumer perceives he/she has been able to reflect his/her evaluation of a soft drink accurately.

This four-item, seven-point scale is used to measure the degree to which people say they are confident in their ability to understand and use specified nutritional information on food packaging.

The scale measures the degree to which a person believes that a website enables the user to know where he/she is, go where he/she wants to go, and do what he/she wants to accomplish at the site.

The six item, nine-point Likert-type scale measures the difficulty a consumer had in knowing what people from various references groups thought about products and what their recommendations would have been. The scale was called ambiguous social reaction by Heitmann, Lehmann, and Herrmann (2007).

Six statements with seven-point response formats are used to measure the extent to which a consumer had relevant information when making a decision. The items seem to be especially appropriate when referring to the level of information one had prior to external search activity. This is probably why Urbany, Dickson, Wilkie (1989) referred to the scale as pre-search uncertainty.