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The degree to which a patient believes that the person or device making a recommendation about a medical procedure would not give consideration to his/her unique condition and circumstances is measured with three, seven-point items.

How much a person prefers not to make decisions related to a certain domain is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items. 

The efficacy and likelihood that a “treatment” will cure a “condition” are measured with five, nine-point questions.  The particular treatment and condition are specified in the items.

The scale employs five, seven-point Likert-type items to measure a person’s plan to engage in certain behaviors in order to prevent skin cancer, with an emphasis on using suncreen.

A person’s expressed likelihood of engaging in behaviors that involve prevention or treatment of a health condition is measured with four, seven-point questions.  The particular health condition is not stated in the questions and should be provided in the instructions or the context of the study.

Three, seven-point items compose the scale and measure how much a person believes a particular treatment would prevent serious health consequences, including a life-threatening condition.

The scale is composed of four, seven-point items intended to measure person's interest in and likelihood of trying a particular prescription medication.

The degree to which a patient provided information and was actively involved in decision making with his/her physician during a specific visit is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a patient is pleased with the service provided by a physician and the medical facility during a specific visit is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale measures how strongly a person believes that a particular good or service is able to reveal if a person has a certain life-threatening ailment.  Three, five-point items compose the scale.