You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

This website has truly been a welcome gift! The Day Pass is extremely affordable & the site is so user friendly to navigate. It provides a wealth of information including, the source, validity, & references for my doctorate research project. I highly recommend this to anyone as it is truly an invaluable research tool!
Suzanne Cromlish, PhD
Saint Xavier University, Chicago

movement

A seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure how much a person believes or “feels” that a particular object in an ad appears it be moving in the appropriate direction.   Both a four-item and a three-item version are described.

The scale measures the extent to which a visual pattern, such as in a print advertisement, is interpreted as indicating motion, particularly forward movement.  Four, seven-point semantic differential phrases compose the scale.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure how much a person believes she/he was able to move a hologram with his/her hands.

The degree to which a person believed that a hologram was moved because of his/her voice-commands is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale uses three, seven-point items to measure the degree to which a person believes that an unspecified “external force” is pushing him/her forward.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure the degree to which a logo appears to move as if it is alive.

A six-item, seven-point semantic differential is used to measure the level of crowding a consumer perceives there to be in some specified shopping context. The measure was referred to as perceived retail crowding by Eroglu and Machleit (1990).

This is a four-item, five-point scale that measures the degree of importance a consumer places on ease of getting around in a store.