You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensable in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

needs

The scale uses five, nine-point semantic differentials to measure whether a person considers his/her future needs to be most important or his/her current needs.

The scale has five, nine-point items that measure how much a parental role (mothers or fathers) generally has the primary responsibility for taking care of a child’s needs in the future.  The relative role responsibilities of mothers and fathers is not measured in the scale per se.  A proper comparison can be made if the scale is filled out once for mothers and then for fathers followed by an appropriate statistical test of the two scores.

In general, how much a parental role (mothers or fathers) has the primary responsibility for taking care of a child’s immediate needs is measured with five, nine-point items.  The relative role responsibilities of mothers and fathers is not measured in the scale per se.  A proper comparison can be made if the scale is filled out once for mothers and then for fathers followed by an appropriate statistical test of the two scores.

The desire to fit in with and be part of a particular group of fans is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a customer believes a service provider is the best is because it understands his/her needs better than the others.  The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items.

A person’s motivation to increase his/her social status is measured in this scale with four, seven-point Likert-like items.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person believes a particular advertisement addressed concerns about a product that was important to him/her.

The degree to which a person believes that his/her resources are insufficient and that more are needed is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.  The items themselves are rather general.  Focusing participants’ attention on a particular situation and type of resource would need to be done in the context of the study or the questionnaire’s instructions.

One’s attitude about which of the two genders is needier and requires more care is measured with three, nine-point items.  The questions are phrased in terms of “boys” and “girls.”

With five, six-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person tends to process information such that it is conscious, intentional, analytic, and relatively affect free.