You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

nervousness

This scale uses five, seven-point uni-polar items to measure how much a person feels nervous and afraid.

Composed of four, seven-point uni-polar items, the scale measures how much a person feels tense and uneasy at some point or period of time.

At the current time, how much a person experiences and expresses emotions related to anxiety is measured with five, five-point items. 

The extent to which a person currently feels anxious and nervous rather than calm and relaxed is measured with eight, seven-point uni-polar items.

Using three, 10 point questions, this scale measures the degree to which a person thought about how he/she was being evaluated by a particular person with whom he/she had interacted.  In this case, “evaluation” is meant more in the sense of being “sized-up” or judged rather than formal testing or professional diagnosis.

The general level of discomfort a person reports feeling in the presence of others is measured with six statements.

This seven item, 10 point Likert-type scale measures a type of social anxiety that primarily occurs as a result of interacting with other people.

Four, seven-point semantic differentials are used in this scale to measure the level of fear that has been evoked by some stimulus.

How much a consumer feels nervous and worried about buying a specified product is measured in this scale with three, seven point Likert-type items.

The scale uses three, nine-point uni-polar terms to measure how much a person feels under pressure and worried about something.  The scale is "general" in the sense that the three items composing the scale are not specific to any particular object or event and can be paired with properly written instructions for any number of contexts.