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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

newness

Using three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a person believes that a particular good or service is new to the market and different from alternative products.

How much a person believes it would be a good idea for a product to be upgraded is measured with three items.  The phrasing of the sentences lends itself most to upgrade decisions made by someone else but which the respondent would be affected. 

How new and surprising a product development process is believed to be is measured using four, seven-point items.  The statements composing the scale are flexible enough to be used when comparing two products or when assessing just one product, but the response formats would need to be different.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes that the packaging for a particular product is new and unique.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure whether the product featured in an ad is considered fresh and new or old and routine.

The anticipated popularity of a new product and the interest among consumers in purchasing it is measured with three, seven-point questions.

A person's description of his/her level of innovativeness and originality is measured with three, five-point uni-polar items.

Three statements are used in this scale to measure a customer's opinion of how much a particular salesperson provides information about new goods and services.

Four, seven-point items are used to measure how distinct and unexpected a particular object is viewed to be.  As used by Kim, Han, and Yoon (2010), the object was an advertisement.

This three-item, seven-point scale is used to measure how new and different a product is compared to current products the consumer is aware of and the perceived impact it would have on the consumer's behavior.