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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

outcomes

Five, seven-point items are used to measure the extent to which a consumer is actively considering what to do with a particular new product in order to achieve positive outcomes and avoid negative ones.

Using three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the belief that one has the ability to make situations turn out the way he/she wants.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure how much time and effort a person must expend in order to follow the advice given to him/her by a professional in order to achieve the desired outcome.

The scale measures the degree to which a person’s motivation with regard to self-improvement is more about accomplishing a goal rather than the activities performed to reach it.  Five, nine-point Likert-type items compose the scale.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used in this scale to measure a person’s judgement of whether an advertisement emphasized benefits gained by the person taking an action or the losses and costs if the action was not taken. 

Three Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person would make a different choice if possible given an outcome that has occurred to a decision he/she made.

The scale measures how strongly a person believes that a particular good or service is able to reveal if a person has a certain life-threatening ailment.  Three, five-point items compose the scale.

The scale measures how bad a person believes the unintended reactions of a health-related good/service could be.  The construct being measured is akin to the consequences component of perceived risk (e.g., Cox 1967; Dowling 1986).  Three, five-point items compose the scale.

The scale measures the degree to which a person thinks about the potential future consequences of his/her current behavior and how much he/she is influenced by these possible outcomes.  Twelve items are used to measure the construct.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure the extent to which a person is pleased with the result of a particular event, e.g., bargaining.