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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensable in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

ownership

Using three, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much one customer believes another customer has engaged in behavior which disrespected one’s personal space and signaled it was his/her own.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure how much a person believes that rent-to-own businesses improve lives and provide important services to society.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure a consumer’s belief that he/she has the power to handle and use an object as desired.

This scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure a consumer’s beliefs that he/she has insight into the characteristics, quality, and aesthetics of an object.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items the scale measures how much a consumer feels that he/she has devoted money, emotion, and other psychological resources to an object.

The scale uses four Likert-type items to measure how much a person believes that another person does not legally own a certain item but is engaging in behaviors that seem to signal that he/she does.

Using seven statements, this scale measures the degree to which a person believes that he/she is familiar with and has experience using goods and/or services in a particular domain.  Versions of the scale are described for tech products, fast-food restaurants, personal banking, movie theaters, and social media websites.

This scale uses four, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a person believes that advertising makes people buy and consume products too much.  As discussed further below, the items are phrased with respect to advertising in general but they can be easily adapted for use with particular media.

How likely a person believes it is that he/she will choose a product sharing program rather than buying a certain product is measure with three, six-point items.

Three, six-point Likert-type items measure a person's belief that a product that is shared with others is just as good as one that is personally owned.