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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

parents

Four, seven-point questions are used to measure how much a particular activity or other stimulus motivated a person to have feelings associated with parenting such as nurturing and devotion.

The scale uses three, seven-point questions to measure how much a particular activity or other stimulus motivated a person to think about the responsibilities involved with taking care of a child.

The scale has five, nine-point items that measure how much a parental role (mothers or fathers) generally has the primary responsibility for taking care of a child’s needs in the future.  The relative role responsibilities of mothers and fathers is not measured in the scale per se.  A proper comparison can be made if the scale is filled out once for mothers and then for fathers followed by an appropriate statistical test of the two scores.

In general, how much a parental role (mothers or fathers) has the primary responsibility for taking care of a child’s immediate needs is measured with five, nine-point items.  The relative role responsibilities of mothers and fathers is not measured in the scale per se.  A proper comparison can be made if the scale is filled out once for mothers and then for fathers followed by an appropriate statistical test of the two scores.

How much a parent engages in active co-use of the Internet with his/her child in order to guide behavior is measured using six, seven-point Likert-type items.

With four, five-point items, the scale measures an adolescent’s belief that his/her parents would care about he/she thought if they said some media content is unsuitable for children, e.g., there is too much violence in movies and video games.

Four, five-point items are used in this scale to measure an adolescent’s belief about what his/her parents would say if they did not want him/her to watch television, movies, or video games that contained too much violence.  Specifically, this belief is a characterized by the parents “restricting” the time the child spends with the unacceptable media content and providing rationale in which the perspective of the adolescent is taken seriously.

The scale has four, five-point items that measure what an adolescent thinks his/her parents would do if they did not want him/her to watch television, movies, or video games that contained too much violence.  Specifically, this belief is a characterized by the parents “restricting” the time the child spends with unacceptable media content by using anger and threatening punishment.

The scale uses four, five-point items to measure the degree to which an adolescent thinks his/her parents are inconsistent in their restriction of the time he/she can spend with television, movies, and video games that contained too much violence.

The belief that one’s parent(s) firmly directed the children while they were growing up and expected unquestioning obedience is measured with ten Likert items.