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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

perception

The degree to which a person focused his/her attention on something specific (stated in the items) is measured with three questions and a ten-point response scale.

With three Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s attitude regarding the naturalness and solidness of a mediated environment that he/she has experienced. 

Six, nine-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person is easily able to imagine how furniture would look in a dwelling (house or apartment).

Four, nine-point uni-polar items measure how much a color or an object’s color is bright and vibrant.

Five, five-point items measure how much a person felt immersed in a story and distanced from reality.

With ten, seven-point items, the scale measures how much a person is absorbed in an activity because it is the optimal challenge for his/her skill.

The Likert scale has eight, five-point items that measure how much a person has had an experience in a virtual environment which allowed interaction with a simulated representation of a product.

With three, seven-point items, the scale measures the degree to which a person was daydreaming or thinking about other things during a particular task.

Six, seven-point semantic differentials measure the ease with which some particular written information was read and processed.  

The degree to which a person reports being able to “see” in his/her mind a particular object or action is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.