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The Marketing Scales website is a gold mine of information.  It is the only source that helps me understand the psychometric quality of the instruments used in past research.  I recommend that researchers bookmark this site . . . they will be back!
Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

perception

The scale has four, five-point items that measure how much a person experiences a loss of time consciousness and awareness of his/her physical surroundings when at a particular website.

The degree to which some information or object has evoked thoughts of self and family is measured in this scale with three, seven-point items.

The perceived heaviness of an object is measured in this scale using three, nine-point bi-polar adjectives.

The perceived difficulty a person has had in processing a message (e.g., advertisement, instructions, request) is measured in this scale using three, seven-point semantic differentials.  The scale was called fluency by White and Peloza (2009) and processing fluency by White, MacDonnell, and Dahl (2011).

Three items are used in this scale to measure how well a person judges his/her performance to have been of a recently completed task.

Ten, five point Likert-like items are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a person who has recently engaged in a certain task describes his/her processing of information to have been done in a logical, rule-based manner.

This scale uses ten, five point Likert-like items to assess how much a person who has recently engaged in a certain task describes his/her processing of information as being conducted quickly, almost effortlessly, and depending heavily on affect.

Five, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure the degree to which a stimulus (or task) requires a person to devote high level of cognitive effort to process (or complete).

A 35-item, seven-point Likert-like scale is used to measure the clarity of mental images a person is able to evoke. This measures a person's general ability to imagine several types of sensations and is not limited to a particular sense or stimulus. It has been referred to by various names, but most of them include the original creator's name (Betts).

Six, nine-point, Likert-like items are used to measure the degree and ease with which a person reports images coming to mind while processing some specific stimulus. In the experiments conducted by Bone and Ellen (1992) as well as Miller and Marks (1992), the stimuli were mock radio commercials.