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The Marketing Scales website is a gold mine of information.  It is the only source that helps me understand the psychometric quality of the instruments used in past research.  I recommend that researchers bookmark this site . . . they will be back!
Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

personality

A person's tendency to learn about and adopt innovations (new products) within a specific domain of interest is measured with six, five-point Likert-type items.  The scale is intended to be distinct from a generalized personality trait at one extreme and a highly specific, single product purchase at the other extreme.

The extent to which a person is routinely seeking better alternatives in many aspects of life is measured with six, seven-point Likert-type items.

Seven items assess the degree to which a person exhibits a trait-like tendency characterized by lack of behavioral and cognitive control.

Composed of nine, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes he/she deserves more than others because of being special and not due to effort or skill.

The importance a person places on instructions and procedures to guide his/her expectations, particularly in a work context, is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items. 

Using four, seven-point uni-polar items, the scale measures how much a person believes his/her personality to be dependable and disciplined rather than disorganized and careless.

How much a person describes another person as a friend who is likable and fun to be around is measured with four, five-point Likert-type items.

A person’s belief that he/she is lucky and frequently experiences it is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale has four, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the amount of competition one feels there is between his/her self-identities.  The particular identities referred to in the sentences are ideal and ought.  

The link between two of one’s self-identities is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.  The particular identities referred to in the sentences are ideal and ought.