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Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

personality

This three-item, six-point, Likert-type scale measures a person's stated tendency to try new brands. These items as a set have been called new brand tryer in several studies.

This is a 15-item, Likert-type scale purported to measure a consumer's expressed tendency to stand up for his/her rights with marketers and their representatives. The scale covers three interaction situations: resisting requests for compliance, requesting information or assistance, and seeking redress. An 11-item version of the scale translated into Dutch was used by Richins (1987).

This is a 15-item, semantic differential scale that has been used to measure the actual self-concept, the ideal self-concept, the social self-concept, and other similar constructs such as one's concept of another person or one's concept of a product.

A seven-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person reports him/herself to like shopping around and gathering product information even if not immediately needing to buy anything. Raju (1980) referred to the measure as exploration through shopping.

This is a ten-item, seven-point Likert-type scale measuring the degree to which a person reports him/herself to be interested in trying a variety of marketing-entities things such as new stores, restaurants, and brands.

This is a three-item, five-point Likert-type scale intended to measure the degree to which a person attributes success to his or her own efforts versus fate or other forces.

A 34-item scale is used to measure a person's expressed tendency to experience three dimensions of psychological hostility: assault, irritability, and verbal hostility.

A forty-item, six-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree of openness (or lack thereof) in a person's belief systems. A 20-item version of the scale was used by Shimp and Sharma (1987).

This is a three-item, seven-point Likert-type scale measuring a person's reported desire to be among the first to buy new things.

This 12-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person reads ads, shops around, and gathers information apparently out of curiosity.