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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

personality

The degree to which a person expresses a trait-like need for power and the tendency to be controlling in social relationships is measured with six, seven-point items.

The degree to which a person believes him/herself to be in control and able to get his/her way is measured with five, ten-point Likert-type items.  The statements themselves are rather general and do not explicitly measure power as a trait or as a state.  Instructions used with the statements can help focus participants’ attention on one versus the other type of powerfulness.

Fourteen, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person’s trait-like tendency to be concerned about the needs of others as well as expecting help from them when needed.

The extent to which a person believes in one’s ability to change the self is measured with four, six-point Likert-type items.

Seven, seven-point Likert-type items measure a person’s general and enduring tendency to experience feelings that are expressed in terms of optimism about the future.

With six, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s general and enduring tendency to experience feelings of closeness and trust with other people.

A person’s desire to be distinct from others and to do things that make one’s self different is measured with three, nine-point items.

The belief that one can change his/her personal traits is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale measures the degree to which a person believes that he/she has the motivation and the ability to control and achieve desired outcomes.  The scale is general in the sense that it can be used in a wide variety of contexts.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items compose the scale and measure one’s tendency to make decisions and to buy impulsively with regard to a specific good or service.