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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

personality

This seven item scale is intended to measure a person’s ability to alter his/her behavior in order to portray an image suited for a social situation.

With four, six-point items, the scale measures a person’s expressed ability to understand others' "true" feelings based primarily on observing their nonverbal behavior.

The extent to which a person views him/herself as being creative and believes that others think that as well is measured in this scale with three, five-point items.

A person's ability to imagine how new product concepts could be developed in order to be more useful and relevant to consumers is measured in this scale with eight, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a person believes that fate determines outcomes in life (external locus of control) verses self (internal locus of control) is measured in this scale using six, seven-point items. 

The scale has been used to measure a type of private introspection and self-attentiveness stimulated by curiosity.  Twelve, five-point Likert-type items compose the scale.

Five, 11-point items are used in this scale to measure the cognitive and emotional bonds between a brand and a consumer.

The salience of the cognitive and emotional bonds between a brand and a consumer is measured in this scale with three, 11-point items.  Salience is indicated by the frequency and ease with which brand-related emotions and thoughts are described as occurring.

Three, seven-point unipolar items are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a person is characterized by a personality-type factor having to do with productivity and intelligence.

A person's belief in either the stability of personality traits (entity theory) or their malleability (incremental theory) is measured in this scale using eight, seven-point Likert-type items.