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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

price

Using three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how strongly a consumer believes that the discount offered by a retailer for a product is a good value.

This six-item, seven-point Likert-type scale measures how much a consumer is generally concerned about product prices, especially when they are viewed as “high.”

A consumer’s belief that the price of a brand is reasonable and a good value is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

This very simple three-item, seven-point Likert-type scale measures a person’s attitude about the price of a particular good or service with the emphasis on its acceptability.

The subjective probability expressed by a consumer that indicates he/she would buy a particular product at its present price is measured with five, seven-point items.

The scale measures the degree to which a person who sold an item to a buyer experienced a feeling of completeness and closure due to the price that was negotiated.  Four, seven-point Likert-type items compose the scale.

Using three, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a customer believes a particular website has low prices on products and shipping.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a consumer believes that what is received when buying a good or service is greater than what is given up. 

With three, seven-point semantic differentials, the scale measures the degree to which a customer believes that, in general, the prices of a company's products are appropriate given the value of the products.

The scale uses three, five-point Likert-type items to measure the extent to which a consumer believes a brand is on sale a lot and not expensive.