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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensable in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

privacy

How much a particular product is considered to be private and something that would not be discussed with a stranger is measured with five, seven-point items.

This scale uses four, seven-point items to measure how much a person feels that when using his/her smartphone there is a sense of being in a private, safe place.

Ten Likert-type items measure how much a person has the tendency to keep secrets about him/herself due to the information being considered embarrassing or distressing.

Containing four, five-point statements, the scale measures a person's hesitancy to reveal something about a particular experience because of the belief it was a private matter.

How much a consumer believes a particular product will be used in situations where other people will see it is measured with three items.  A low score on the scale would imply the product will only be used in private, such as at home.

Using three, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a customer’s overall attitude toward the security and privacy facets of a particular retailer’s website.

The clarity with which a person understands what a particular company does with the data it has on its customers is measured with four, seven-point semantic-differentials.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure how much a person believes it is okay to give misleading or incomplete personal information to a company and that he/she is likely to do it.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a person has confidence in the reliability with which a company handles the customer data in its possession.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items measure a customer’s attitude regarding his/her susceptibility to being harmed because of the personal information collected by a company.