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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

problem

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the extent to which a person contacted someone or an organization that has legal expertise and may help with a complaint against a party.  (The party is not explicitly referred to in the scale but a fitting example would be a service provider.)

The scale uses five, seven-point Likert-type items to measure how much a person who used a mobile app to perform a financial transaction believes it did not process correctly.

Three, ten-point Likert-type items are used to measure how much a person who has observed a problem situation believes a particular person is responsible for it.  The respondent is the observer of the problem and is not otherwise involved in the problem that occurred.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure how much of a problem a customer believes a particular service failure is, was, or could be.

Using three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a person believes that an employee has engaged in behaviors to actively and competently solve a customer’s problem.

With three, 101-point items, the purpose of the scale is to measure how far into the future a certain health problem is believed to be.

A customer's belief regarding how bad a problem was created by a particular product failure he/she experienced is measured in this scale with four, five-point Likert-type items.

A consumer’s pattern of acknowledging and defining needs/wants for clothing is measured using eight, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale has three, seven-point semantic differentials that measure the degree to which a certain problem that could be experienced at a business is viewed by a consumer as being very important rather than trivial.

A customer's belief that a certain problem with respect to service delivery is typical is measured in this scale using three, seven-point semantic differentials.