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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

quality

Six, five-point Likert-type items measure how much a child likes a particular product and believes it does what it is expected to do.

The scale measures how much the service employees of a company are believed to be competent, polite, and helpful among other characteristics.  Two versions of the scale are described, one that has eight, eleven-point items and another with six, seven-point items.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person believes a group of restaurants are premium quality due to the high quality of the food as well as the prices charged.

Composed of four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the difficulty a person has in making decisions in life, especially with respect to consumer-related choices, e.g., struggling to decide what gifts to get for friends.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure the degree to which a person has high standards when making choices in life and does not settle for anything less than the best.

How much a person considers a relationship he/she has with a particular entity such as a person or company to be characterized by trust and loyalty is measured with four, seven-point semantic differentials.

The scale has six items that measure the likelihood that a person will engage in behaviors indicating he/she will purchase services again from a particular business and will recommend it to others as well.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes a particular product looks good and is durable.

Four semantic differentials are used to measure the degree to which a person believes that if he/she hired a particular person for a stated job, the outcome would be good.

With three, seven-point items, the scale measures how certain a person is that a particular real estate agent will provide him/her with good service in finding a place to live.