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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

quality

The five-item, seven-point scale measures a person's attitude toward a company with an emphasis on the favorability of beliefs the person has about the company with regard to a range of business abilities. The scale was called company evaluation by Sen and Bhattacharya (2001).

The scale is composed of three, five-point Likert-type items intended to measure the extent to which a person (adult) believes that the television programs aimed at kids are of high quality.

Three items are used to measure a theater attendee's attitude about the physical facilities of a specified theater.

A shopper's attitude about the number and quality of the employees working in a store are measured in this scale with four, seven-point Likert-type items. Although Baker, Levy, and Grewal (1992) and Baker, Grewal, and Parasuraman (1994) described the scale as measuring "the store social factor," it is clear from an examination of the items that the focus was on the employee aspect of retail social interaction.

This scale measures how dependable a customer views a service provider to be based upon the quality of its most visible attributes. The version by Parasuraman, Zeithaml, and Berry (1994b) goes a bit further and measures perceptions of tangible assets compared with the desired  level (the performance level the company can and should deliver).

This four-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person thinks a service company's employees are helpful and responsive to customer needs. As described here, the scale relates to the responsiveness dimension of the SERVQUAL instrument (Parasuraman, Berry, and Zeithaml 1991; Parasuraman, Zeithaml, and Berry 1988) but is not equivalent to it. Each dimension of the SERVQUAL measure is composed of the summated differences between expectation items and perceptual items, not just perceptual items as the scale described here is. Carman (1990) used several variations on the scale, as described subsequently. Taylor (1995) only used perceptual items.

This scale measures how dependable a person thinks a company is in providing a service. The version by Parasuraman, Zeithaml, and Berry (1994b) goes a bit further and measures perceptions of reliability compared with the desired service level (the performance level the company can and should deliver).

A four-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person thinks the material and human aspects of a service provider are visually appealing. As described here, the scale relates to the tangibles dimension of the SERVQUAL instrument (Parasuraman, Berry, and Zeithaml 1991; Parasuraman, Zeithaml, and Berry 1988) but is not equivalent to it. Each dimension of the SERVQUAL measure is composed of the summated differences between expectation items and perceptual items, not just perceptual items as the scale described here is. Carman (1990) used several variations on the scale, as described subsequently. Taylor (1995) only used perceptual items.

Five, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure the perception that the retailer is keeping promises made and that it performs its functions well so that customers can get in and out efficiently.

Five, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure a customer's perception of a store's policies that make it more advantageous for people to shop there, such as carrying high-quality products, having convenient parking and hours, and taking credit cards.