You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

quality

Six, seven-point items are used to measure the degree to which an apartment featured in an ad is viewed as being of high quality.

Seven, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure the degree to which a person expresses a positive opinion of a beverage. The scale can be used before or after a person has tasted the product. If used before drinking a beverage, then the respondent must imagine what it would taste like on the basis of the stimuli provided (verbal descriptions, graphics, brand name, ad, etc.).

Five, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure several quality-related aspects of a product. The scale probably makes the most sense if used with regard to products made in another country.

Five, five-point phrases are purported to measure a person's (e.g., a former student's) evaluation of several aspects of his or her college education experience.

Three, five-point Likert-type statements are used to measure the degree to which a consumer reports having considerable knowledge about the grocery stores in the local shopping area as it relates to the relative quality of their specialty departments (bakery, deli, and meat).

A person's evaluation of some negative aspects of a particular brand of a product made in a specified country are measured with this three-item, ten-point scale. The product examined by Parameswaran and Pisharodi (1994) was a blender and the scale was referred to as Specific Product Attributes (negative blender attributes).

Four, ten-point items are used to measure a person's evaluation of some aspects of a particular car made in a particular country. This scale was referred to as Specific Product Attributes (cars) by Parameswaran and Pisharodi (1994).

The degree to which a person has a positive attitude about some specified product from some particular country is measured in this scale with three, nine-point Likert-type items.

A person's evaluation of some positive aspects of products made in another country are measured using this ten-point scale. The final versions of the scale used in the analysis of German and Korean products had three items, but only two of the items were the same. This scale was referred to as General Product Attributes (positive attributes relating to product image) by Parameswaran and Pisharodi (1994).

A five-item, ten-point summated scale is used to measure a person's evaluation of some undesirable aspects of products made in another country. This scale was referred to as General Product Attribute (negative) by Parameswaran and Pisharodi (1994).