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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

quality

Four, nine-point uni-polar items are used to measure the degree to which a consumer believes that a particular pair of jeans is durable and well made.

Nine-point Likert-type items are used to measure a consumer’s belief that there is evidence that a particular product is genuinely a particular brand rather than a fake or confusingly similar one.  A two- and a four-item version are provided.

Three, seven-point items measure a person’s general belief that the current day will be good rather than bad.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which one believes the quality and other information about a particular product cannot be judged even after buying and using it.

The belief that one cannot determine the quality and other attributes of a particular product until after it has been purchased and used is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items compose the scale and measure one’s belief that he/she can judge the quality and other attributes of a particular product before buying it.

Four, seven-point items are used to measure a person’s attitude about the usefulness of the third-party label on a package that attests to some aspect of the product’s quality.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a consumer’s general belief that brand name products in a certain product category are essentially the same as those brands owned by the store.  (How they are viewed as “the same” is not stated in the items.)

The level of trust a person has in a third party label on a package and the party sponsoring it that attests to an aspect of the product’s quality is measured using six, seven-point Likert-type items.

A person’s attitude about a particular third-party that sponsors certification seals that attest to environmentally-related product attributes is measured using five, seven-point semantic differentials.