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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

recommendation

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure how likely it is that a person will recommend a place and talk about it positively.  The sentences are phrased generally enough that they can refer to a wide variety of “places,” e.g., a restaurant, a museum, a church.

The degree to which a patient believes that the person or device making a recommendation about a medical procedure would not give consideration to his/her unique condition and circumstances is measured with three, seven-point items.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items measure a consumer’s commitment to buy a particular brand in the future if it is available. 

Five, seven-point Likert-type items measure a person’s (the recommender’s) beliefs regarding the potential negative social consequences of recommending a person who could view it as inappropriate.  The sentences are flexible for use with a variety of contexts but may make the most sense with regard to customer referral reward programs. 

Six items are used to measure the belief that a particular salesperson engaged in questioning and answering in an attempt to convince one that he/she (the consumer) would benefit from a suggested product solution.

How much a person believes that a particular recommendation provided important and helpful information is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  Since the recommendation is not identified in the items themselves, the scale appears to be suitable for a wide variety of situations.

How much a person likes customer referral programs in general and is likely to participate in them is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale has three, nine-point items that measure a person’s stated likelihood of sharing good information about a brand to others he/she knows.

Four, seven-point items are used to measure the likelihood that a consumer will regularly wear sunscreen in the future as well as recommend that others do so too.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure the likelihood a consumer will avoid buying products that contain a specific chemical and, instead, will purchase a particular brand that does not have the chemical.