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Testimonial

I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

reliability

How much a person believes that people working for an organization (retailer, company, non-profit) have his/her the best interests in mind and keep their promises is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

One's attitude regarding his/her ability to accurately remember things he/she has experienced or known in the past is measured with four, seven-point items.

Using four, seven-point uni-polar items, the scale measures how much a person believes his/her personality to be dependable and disciplined rather than disorganized and careless.

The level of confidence a person has in a particular retailer and belief in its reliability is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes a particular product looks good and is durable.

The degree to which an object or event is considered to be consistent and stable at one extreme or erratic and risky at the other is measured with ten, seven-point bi-polar adjectives.

How reliable and dependable a consumer believes a product (good or service) to be is measured with three, seven-point items.

A person’s belief regarding the durability and stability of a medium’s format is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

Using three, ten-point items, the scale measures a customer’s evaluation of the quality of a brand's goods and/or services based on recent consumption experiences.

The degree to which a person believes a particular retailer could be reliable and depended upon is measured with four, nine-point Likert-type items.