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The Marketing Scales website is a gold mine of information.  It is the only source that helps me understand the psychometric quality of the instruments used in past research.  I recommend that researchers bookmark this site . . . they will be back!
Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

rewards

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure how much a person is motivated to seek something stimulating and satisfying at the current time.

The belief that an employee can reward and punish other employees is measured with three, seven-point items.

Using six items, the scale measures the belief that a particular salesperson with whom a consumer interacted used compliance tactics based on immediate, superficial factors (threats and promises) not directly related to the product itself.

The enjoyment a consumer experiences by being involved in programs offered by companies that give rewards for helping to recruit new customers is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  The sentences are phrased such that they make most sense for those who have participated in such programs.

The scale uses four, seven-point items to measure how much a person expresses a chronic motivation after having achieved a short-term goal to take advantage of behavior that is inconsistent with a long-term goal.

How much a person wants something rewarding as soon as possible is measured in this scale with ten, seven-point Likert-type items.

With four items and a seven-point Likert-type response format, the scale measures the degree of concern a person has about tipping at a particular service-related retail establishment.  The scale is flexible for use in a variety of contexts in which tipping is relevant. 

How much a person believes the nature of a specific reward is not only acceptable but motivates him/her to accomplish something is measured with three, seven-point uni-polar items.

A person’s admission of deserving punishment and desire to punish one’s self is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

With seven items, the scale measures the extent to which a person generally believes that people get what they deserve in life because “the world” is fair.