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satisfaction

The scale measures how pleased a person is with the sales-related services provided by some salespeople who worked together in some capacity during a customer encounter.  The measure is composed of three, nine-point items.

Four, 100-point items measure a person’s satisfaction with his/her current and future financial well-being.

The scale uses four, seven-point Likert-type items to measure how much a customer believes a particular bank he/she uses was a wise choice and provides the needed services.

The scale uses Likert-type items to measure how much a person believes that he/she would not patronize (shop, return to, use) an establishment again in the future and, instead, go to a different one.  Two- and three-item versions are described.

This scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure how much a customer of a specified store (online or not) was satisfied with the product (unspecified) most recently bought there.

How much a person reports feeling happy and content as opposed to sad and depressed at a particular point in time is measured with eight, seven-point uni-polar items. 

Using eight, nine-point items, the scale measures the degree to which a person wants greater physical intimacy with a particular person, e.g., to touch, smell, see, hear.

Four, nine-point Likert-type items are used to measure the extent to which a consumer would buy a brand again despite having had a bad experience with it.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a consumer expresses having an enjoyable experience with a purchased product he/has worked to create with the producer.

The degree to which a person is happy with a resort and pleased with his/her service experience there is measured with a seven-point Likert-type scale.  Three slightly different versions are described.  One directly measures satisfaction, another directly measures dissatisfaction, and the third one has greater emphasis on the service experience.