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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

satisfaction

The likelihood of a customer complaining and seeking redress from a service provider when he/she has had a dissatisfactory service experience is measured with seven, seven-point Likert-type items.  The scale is “general” in the sense that the sentences do not refer to a particular experience but rather the typical inclination when one has had a dissatisfactory encounter.

How much a person considers a relationship he/she has with a particular entity such as a person or company to be characterized by trust and loyalty is measured with four, seven-point semantic differentials.

The scale has four, seven-point bi-polar adjectives that measure how well a person feels about the way a service provider attempted to redress a failure.

Four semantic differentials are used to measure the degree to which a person believes that if he/she hired a particular person for a stated job, the outcome would be good.

The scale measures how pleased a person is with the sales-related services provided by some salespeople who worked together in some capacity during a customer encounter.  The measure is composed of three, nine-point items.

Four, 100-point items measure a person’s satisfaction with his/her current and future financial well-being.

The scale uses four, seven-point Likert-type items to measure how much a customer believes a particular bank he/she uses was a wise choice and provides the needed services.

The scale uses Likert-type items to measure how much a person believes that he/she would not patronize (shop, return to, use) an establishment again in the future and, instead, go to a different one.  Two- and three-item versions are described.

This scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure how much a customer of a specified store (online or not) was satisfied with the product (unspecified) most recently bought there.

How much a person reports feeling happy and content as opposed to sad and depressed at a particular point in time is measured with eight, seven-point uni-polar items.