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Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

satisfaction

The measure is intended to capture the degree to which a person reports that the other party in a transaction gave an explanation for a problem that occurred with a service that was provided. The context in which the respondents were given this scale was after being told to remember a recent service experience that led to their lodging a complaint.  Four, five-point Likert-type items compose the scale.

The four, five-point Likert-type items measure the degree that a person reports that the other party in a transaction put a lot of effort into solving a problem. The context in which the respondents were given this scale was after being told to remember a recent service experience that led to their lodging a complaint.

The three-item, nine-point scale measures the likelihood that a person will use some object again. The statements appear to be amenable for use with a variety of objects such as goods, services, facilities, and even people.

Three items are used to measure a theater attendee's attitude about the physical facilities of a specified theater.

The scale is composed of multiple, five-point descriptors measuring one's overall positive emotional reaction to some stimulus. The stimuli examined in the studies by Coulter (1998) as well as Murry and Dacin (1996) were TV programs whereas in the study by Oliver, Rust, and Varki (1997) it was a recreational wildlife theme park.

This six-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person who has just been involved in a service activity thinks that a  "connection" was made with the person providing the service. That is, the provider and client did not simply play their separate roles but revealed something about each other and that resulted in a unique experience. The activity studied by Price, Arnould, and Tierney (1995) was a river rafting trip, and the river guide was the service provider being evaluated by the customers.

A four-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person thinks the service received was performed properly. As used by Andaleeb and Basu (1994), the scale relates to the quality of service received from a car repair establishment.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person thinks the service received at a facility was prompt and as promised. Andaleeb and Basu (1994) used the scale to measure the quality of service customers believed they received from a car repair establishment.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure how positively a consumer evaluates the quality of service provided by a specified entity such as a business, a government agency, or a university.

The quality of the meal served during a flight is measured with three, seven-point items.  As administered by Taylor and Claxton (1994), the survey (including this scale) was taken toward the end of the flight.