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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

satisfaction

Various non-monetary costs such as time, learning, and effort that are associated with changing brands within a product category are measured in this scale using five, seven-point Likert-type items.

A person's expressed likelihood of making positive comments about something specific is measured in this scale with four, five-point Likert-type items.  Although the items were written with respect to a restaurant, they appear to be amenable for use with a variety of things such as brands, companies, and possibly even salespeople.

Three, five-point items are used to measure the degree to which a customer believes the responsibility for a particular product failure belongs with the company or with him/herself.

The degree of a customer's annoyance with a business and/or its employees because of some sort of service failure is measured in this scale using three, six-point items.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a customer believes his/her relationship with a company is based on the personal service that comes from being treated as an individual.

This scale is composed of five, five-point items that are intended to measure the likelihood of a customer reacting to a service failure by expressing his/her anger to the service employee(s) with hostile gestures or threats of violence.

Seven, seven-point Likert-type sitems are used for measuring the degree to which a consumer recalls having a positive experience with a specified product. The scale was referred to as experience with previous car by Srinivasan and Ratchford (1991).

Three, seven-point items are used for measuring the degree to which a consumer is satisfied with the product-related aspects of a shopping area. As described subsequently, the shopping area studied by Dawson, Bloch, and Ridgway (1990) was a crafts market.

A three-item, seven-point scale is used to measure the level of disconfirmation in beliefs a consumer has toward a particular camera. Disconfirmation refers to the results of the comparison made between expected product performance and actual performance.

A three-item, five-point scale is used to measure the degree to which one reports that something has made him/her feel nervous and fearful. Mano and Oliver (1993) referred to the scale as distress.