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satisfaction

Using three, seven-point items, the scale measures the degree to which a consumer believes a brand is consistently good. 

Various non-monetary costs such as time, learning, and effort that are associated with changing brands within a product category are measured in this scale using five, seven-point Likert-type items.

A person's expressed likelihood of making positive comments about something specific is measured in this scale with four, five-point Likert-type items.  Although the items were written with respect to a restaurant, they appear to be amenable for use with a variety of things such as brands, companies, and possibly even salespeople.

Three, five-point items are used to measure the degree to which a customer believes the responsibility for a particular product failure belongs with the company or with him/herself.

The degree of a customer's annoyance with a business and/or its employees because of some sort of service failure is measured in this scale using three, six-point items.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a customer believes his/her relationship with a company is based on the personal service that comes from being treated as an individual.

This scale is composed of five, five-point items that are intended to measure the likelihood of a customer reacting to a service failure by expressing his/her anger to the service employee(s) with hostile gestures or threats of violence.

Seven, seven-point Likert-type sitems are used for measuring the degree to which a consumer recalls having a positive experience with a specified product. The scale was referred to as experience with previous car by Srinivasan and Ratchford (1991).

Three, seven-point items are used for measuring the degree to which a consumer is satisfied with the product-related aspects of a shopping area. As described subsequently, the shopping area studied by Dawson, Bloch, and Ridgway (1990) was a crafts market.

A three-item, seven-point scale is used to measure the level of disconfirmation in beliefs a consumer has toward a particular camera. Disconfirmation refers to the results of the comparison made between expected product performance and actual performance.