You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensable in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

self

Five, seven-point Likert items measure how much a person relates to and imagines being part of what is in an image (advertisement, photo in social media) involving a product.

The extent to which a person considers another person to be honest and true to him/herself is measured with four, seven-point Likert items.

How much a person attends to one’s self at the moment rather than caring about others is measured with four, seven-point Likert items.

This five-item, seven-point Likert-type attitude scale measures the importance a person generally places on being able to express who he/she is and that it is one of his/her highest values.

The degree to which a person focuses on his/her needs at a particular point in time rather than on others’ needs is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items. 

Whether a person thought the message of an advertisement was more focused on self or on social entities such as family is measured with five, seven-point semantic differentials.

The scale uses seven, seven-point items to measure how much a person cares about what others think of him/her and works to have good relationships with others. 

The scale has four, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the amount of competition one feels there is between his/her self-identities.  The particular identities referred to in the sentences are ideal and ought.  

The link between two of one’s self-identities is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.  The particular identities referred to in the sentences are ideal and ought.  

The degree to which a person feels uneasy as it pertains to his/her identity is measured with three, seven-point items.