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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensable in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

service

This seven-item, seven-point Likert-type scale measures a consumer’s strong emotional bond to a particular service provider.

This four-item, five-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person thinks a hospital, and its rooms in particular, are appealing and clean.

This is a three-item, five-point Likert-type scale that is intended to measure the degree to which a person thinks a specified hospital where he/she has been a patient was accurate in its billing for the services provided.

Six, seven-point Likert-type statements measure the degree to which a person thinks the professors working for an educational institution are helpful to students.

The degree to which a person thinks the professors working for an educational institution are sensitive and concerned about their students' needs is measured with a five-item, seven-point Likert-type scale.

This scale is a 21-item, seven-point Likert-type performance-based measure of service quality. It is viewed as a measure of a consumer's long-term global attitude of an organization rather than his/her transaction-specific satisfaction.

This 11-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used in measuring the degree to which a person thinks the professors working for an educational institution engage in various specified activities that help ensure a high-quality education to students.

The degree to which a patient believes the food served in a particular hospital was delivered when expected and was appetizing is measured with a three-item, five-point Likert-type scale.

This scale is composed of seven-point, Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person thinks access to the employees, facilities, and services of an organization is convenient.

This scale has six, five-point Likert-type items that are intended to measure the degree to which a person thinks the discharge process he/she experienced upon being released after a hospital stay was handled well by the hospital staff.