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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

shape

With three, seven-point semantic differentials, the scale measures how large or small an object is perceived to be.  The scale is considered general because it appears like it could be used for evaluating a wide variety of stimuli.

How soft a person judges a particular seat to be is measured with three, nine-point items.  Given the phrasing of the items, the object should be something a person can sit on and has arms such as with a sofa, chair, or car seat.

The perceived size of a person's body is measured in this scale using three, seven-point semantic differentials.  Given the phrasing of one of the items, the description is relative in that the body being described is compared to another body such as the respondent's.

Ten, six-point items are used to measure the extent of a person's concern about his/her body, with particular emphasis on the anxiety caused by one's body shape and how it is might be viewed by others.

Sixteen, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure the clarity of mental images a person evokes. The scale measures a person's general visual imagery ability rather than the clarity of a particular stimulus under investigation. The scale has been referred to by several users as the Vividness of Visual Imagery Questionnaire (e.g., Childers 1985; Marks 1973).

The three-item, Likert-type scale measures the degree to which a subject perceives two or more ads to be of different size.